/images/TDUpdate2.gif/images/southwire_100x70.jpgSuperconductive Distribution System Sees Over Two Years of Commercial Service - 2009SuperconductiveDistSystemSeesOver2yrsofCommercialService.htmAdvances in cable design and cooling technology reduce the cost of high-efficiency power distribution. Southwire's HTS Triax® Superconducting Cable system recently marked two-and-a-half years of successful power distribution in suburban Columbus, Ohio.
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Superconductive Distribution System Sees Over Two Years of Commercial Service - 2009

Advances in cable design and cooling technology reduce the cost of high-efficiency power distribution.
 

Southwire's HTS Triax® Superconducting Cable system recently marked two-and-a-half years of successful power distribution in suburban Columbus, Ohio.

Superconducting cables are an emerging solution to the challenging task of providing sufficient electric power to densely populated areas. "Using second-generation cable design and advanced cooling technology, the Columbus installation further demonstrates reliability in high-temperature superconductor systems that deliver high-efficiency power distribution in urban settings," says David Lindsay, Southwire's Director of Engineering, Distribution Applications.

Columbus projet performs better than expected in field

Over the past two-and-a-half years, the Columbus system was pushed hard: it saw 2,715 amps per phase during peak summer months (90.5% of its design rating). It also sustained lightning strikes and ambient temperatures from near 0°F with snow and ice to near 100°F heat. Max fault current on the cable has been 17,700 Amps per phase for 222 milliseconds, which included an auto-reclosure of the breaker and repeated 17kA-pk fault 6 seconds after reclosure.

The Columbus HTS installation was designed and field tested to carry up to 3,000 Amps per phase, carry the full 13kV station load and operate at 13.2 kV.

Despite these real-world stresses, the HTS Triax system has not recorded a change in system temperature or pressure. Most impressively, the system has never been out of service due to one of these events. This significant accomplishment has reinforced decisions to move forward with HTS Triax projects in New York City and New Orleans.

Partners come together to expand adoption of HTS Triax Superconducting Cable

The design of the HTS Triax cable wraps phase conductors concentrically around a central core, reducing both cost and cooling requirements. The cable was designed in a joint venture of Southwire and nkt cables, a European cable manufacturer. Southwire, together with partners American Electric Power, Praxair, American Superconductor and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, came together to develop the Columbus HTS project. The project, located at AEP's Bixby Substation outside of Columbus, uses 200 meters (660 feet) of HTS Triax cable to distribute electric power to some 8,600 residential, commercial, and industrial customers.

For more on HTS Triax Superconducting Cable and the Columbus HTS project, visit http://www.htstriax.com.